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Venues-for-hire

Whether you’re looking to celebrate a big birthday, special occasion or simply looking for any excuse for a blowout bash, there are a number of venues available for private hire to suit a range of requirements and budgets. While Hong Kong’s private kitchens offer a great alternative to Hong Kong’s dining scene, other venues offer guests the chance to pick and choose a package to suit your preference – from exclusive access to a lively watering hole to sprawling spaces in the city’s former industrial areas.

 

Blank canvases

 

If you’re looking to make your own fun, booking a no-frills venue-for-hire leaves you with a blank canvas to do with what you will. Luckily, there’s no shortage of these scattered across the city. The White Loft is a customisable space has been used for birthdays, engagement celebrations, christenings and more in the past. Rentals range from a few hours ($2,000) to a full day ($10,000 and include access to standard tech, wifi and tables and chairs.

 

The Soho Printing Press has hosted a number of pop-up restaurants and art exhibitions, and is available for private hire and even overnight bookings. Situated the tail end of Bridges Street between Po Hing Fong and Soho, the venue boasts a private outdoor area and event concierge service to help cater to clients’ every whim. Tailor-made quotations are available on request.

 

Elsewhere in Hong Kong, The Factory is a 2,800-square foot loft space housed in a former industrial building. It has hosted everything from film screenings, private parties, workshops and cooking parties, with a fully-equipped professional kitchen on-site. Comfortably hosting up to 80 people, The Factory offers rentals that are both inclusive and exclusive of catering and drinks packages. The entire venue can be booked from $1,200 per hour via venuehub.hk.

 

Out of the ordinary

 

If you can’t settle on a location for your special occasion, set sail and charter a junk boat for the day (or night). Junks range in size and on-board facilities, and the larger ones can seat up to 40 people. There are countless packages available, from BYO food and drink to fully-catered packages. Read our guide on junk trips for further information.

 

An alternative roving location is booking a private tram. Rentals from Hong Kong Tramways start from $1,100 per hour, with a choice of standard trams, the aptly named antique ‘party trams’ with vanity lights and an open-air upstairs seating section, and the ‘TramOramic’ vehicle. A word of warning, though: timing everything down to a tee is advised, as the trams won’t stop unless at a traffic light.

 

 If you are, however, content with leaving your feet firmly on the ground, behind-closed-doors, the Moonzen Brewery is available for private rental. Seating 50 and accommodating 70 people standing, the pet-friendly venue is available to book via venuehub.hk by the hour ($1,000) or per person (starting from $200).

Outdoor spaces

 

With the scorching summer soon to be a mere memory, alfresco wine and dining becomes a very real possibility rather than a distant pipedream. The Butchers Club’s Secret Kitchen boasts an enormous rooftop, and its multi-purpose rooftop has in the past hosted weddings, film screenings and intimate occasions. The space is available for hire as is or as part of a catered event, with prices depending on requirements.

 

The Cyberport Podium is a tiered outdoor area atop the southside shopping complex and has served as the stage for cinematic and theatre experiences. Prices for a full day’s rental begin at $40,000. Bookings and enquiries can be made via venuehub.hk.

 

This converted village house in Sai Kung lies far enough off the beaten path that you’d be forgiven for forgetting you were only an hour and a half away from the city centre. One-thirtyone offer guests contemporary European cuisine with French influence prepared using home-grown produce. With a private boat mooring and a spacious lawn, the restaurant can be hired exclusively, making this is the perfect place for a private celebration.

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