living costs

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jeffs1

1459871703

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hi is it possible to live on £6000 per year? i will be mortgage free,no kids just me and her growing my own produce etc.i'm 62 and wife is 57 we have simple lifestyle,looking to slowdown a bit.thanks for looking

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Josephine-Blogger-853338 1459878839

The main problem I see is that you will need healthcare in place. The NHS only covers UK residents. You may not be accepted into the French state healthcare system on that income because it may not be considered sufficient for a couple for 'stable and regular' residence in France. In that case, unless you have a cunning plan, you'd need to take out full private health insurance for both of you which could cost several thousand in itself. You can't live in France without health cover. Well I suppose you could but for one thing it would be irregular, and for another what if one of you desperately needs medical care that you can't afford.

Rudge 1459934811

I live in France as it can be cheaper than UK , and after divorce the UK is unnafordable for me, unless I want to spend retirement on benefit. It all depends on what lifestyle you seek, A small house here has low taxes compared to UK , utilities are lower as well .
I run an older economy car, economy small motorcycle, have a bicycle, grow a lot of my own fruit and vegetables , make jam and sauces from blackberries, sloes etc , preserve most of what I cannot use fresh etc . I benefit from being over 65, my small income gives me exemption from tax habitation, Tv licence etc , which helps . I heat by wood , use LED bulbs and try not to waste anything . It is a comfortable lifestyle, but for 2 of us I spend around all of my small pension of £9800 a year . Without vehicles , wine etc I could obviously live on less.
The falling pound value does not help at present though, as mu UK paid pension to euros is dropping weekly .
Hope this helps

Josephine-Blogger-853338 1459939954

Yes as Rudge says, UK pensioners can enjoy the benefits of what's cheaper about France without the disadvantage of the one thing that is far more expensive than in the UK, ie healthcare. Once you start getting your UK state pension, the UK picks up your healthcare costs via an S1, and that makes a huge difference.

nellyhei 1459941919

As a previous poster has mentioned not being retired will be a problem in getting health care, I don't know if it has changed but it used to be the first to retire could then have their Husband/Wife on their Carte Vitale but your wife being 57 I'm not sure if they would let her go on it for so long? You do get between 18 months and 2 yrs on an S1 I think depending on your NI contributions paid in UK but please check this !! If you buy somewhere small and near to a village it does cut down on petrol costs also there is more going on. For food and cleaning products I buy most of mine at Lidls, but check the pub papers that get put in your letter box as these sometimes have good offers in them.
I do know of a couple of people that live on about £6000.00 but it's tight and alright till something goes wrong car breaks down etc... also if you keep going back to UK you will find your money drains away. If it were me I would wait till after June when hopefully all this EU business is sorted out and we will all hopefully know where we stand.

Rudge 1459961483

Some sensible points from posters, do not live where you have to drive to get daily needs , in or edge of village with services helps a lot . When I reached retirement and gained an S1 from UK it was/is normal to be able to get an S1 for a younger partner as well , my wife is in her 50,s, non EU and now has a Carte Vitale in her name , on the basis of my entitlement . Like most knowledgeable expats, I shop at Lidl once a week, most of my other food comes from my garden , eggs included .
£6000 is a tight budget , it helps if you can repair and do most jobs yourself, when i moved here I purchased everything I thought I would need for house and garden in advance, even tools and materials to limit the outlay here , and survived on around £6000 until my pensions kicked in at 65, which made it a lot easier .
So, my view is that it can be done , takes a lot of planning but I never regret it , and when over 65 it is easier and enjoyable retirement kicks in , after a couple of years you have all that garden planning and fruit tree growing bonus kicking in as well .

Josephine-Blogger-853338 1459963152

If the 6k has to stretch to cover healthcare for 2 for 4 years until the OP hits 66 and his UK pension, it seems awful risky to me. What if the £ goes belly up?

taxes 1459964637

isnt there a new law since this year that everyone who lives in France in a stable and regular manner for longer then 3 months is entitled to healthcare?....worth finding out!

Josephine-Blogger-853338 1459967707

Yes but like I said in the first post, it's doubtful whether 6k a year for a couple would tick the box for stable and regular. You have to be able to show you have enough income to support yourself and not to potentially become a burden on the state.

jeffs1 1459968066

I intend to buy a house i then have enough savings to be ok for the next 4years then my pension kicks in but im a bit short of ni contributions thats why ill only have about £6000 per anumm by then i hope i should be settled enough to live ok

Josephine-Blogger-853338 1459974017

Suggest you look into buying the missing years, can turn out not too expensive and often it pays for itself many times over in the long term.

jeffs1 1459974260

I csn only buy back up to 6 years and im up to date from then

moi-383589 1459976970

The most up to date info re French healthcare here
https://www.renestance.com/french-health-insurance-for-everyone/

You are wrong re having to buy private cover

moi-383589 1459976991

The most up to date info re French healthcare here
https://www.renestance.com/french-health-insurance-for-everyone/

You are wrong re having to buy private cover

Josephine-Blogger-853338 1459982842

It's already been said in this thread - in order to be accepted for PUMA you have to show you have sufficient income to live in France (which for a couple under 65 is 787,02€ a month), and also that you currently have health insurance.
"Si vous êtes ressortissant de l'EEE/Suisse et que vous êtes « inactif » : vous ... devez justifier de ressources suffisantes et d'une assurance maladie « complète »" etc
http://www.ameli.fr/assures/soins-et-remboursements/cmu-et-complementaires-sante/la-cmu-de-base-n-existe-plus/l-affiliation-sur-critere-de-residence.php
or from the site you quoted:
"If necessary (ie., if you are non-working but under state retirement age), they will then write and ask you to send proof of income so they can calculate your contributions."

In this respect PUMA is no different to the previous CMU system, which for the last 2 years or so has been accepting early retirees who meet the criteria on exactly the same conditions, and invoicing them for contributions.

If your income is below the threshold it's very unlikely you'll be accepted onto PUMA and therefore, sorry but you would have to buy private cover, otherwise you would risk not being able to pay for treatment that you might need.

chèvrefeuille 1460012131

The answer is no. Your income would be too low to get you into the French healthcare system. I suggest you do what thousands of other people do which is to set up a business to supplement your savings. That would get you into the health system at least.

chèvrefeuille 1460012143

The answer is no. Your income would be too low to get you into the French healthcare system. I suggest you do what thousands of other people do which is to set up a business to supplement your savings. That would get you into the health system at least.

Josephine-Blogger-853338 1460015433

I would be careful with that at the moment. Under the new PUMA system, your tax declaration and your cotisations calculation is a lot more joined up than previously and it looks rather as if people who have paid low cotisations on business earnings during the year, but who have savings or other revenue streams, can be reassessed and sent an additional bill. We'll have to wait until the end of the year to see what happens. But new laws have been introduced and reading between the lines I think PUMA has got a few strings attached that haven't become obvious yet.

nellyhei 1460015631

If you have a house in UK is it possible to rent that out? and rent something here until you know how your income will hold out? Its quite cheap to rent here and it would give you an idea of 'real French life' and all the problems that come with it!! Also it gives you an idea of the area, central Brittany is cheaper than coastal areas and if your fit enough there is Factory work, it's not for the faint hearted but again you could get in the system till your UK pension kicks in. Have you a skill you could use here and work for yourself?? I'm told it is getting more difficult to set up as an A/E as a lot of people are using it to get health cover. It used to be you had to work 30 days a month paid work either working for yourself or employed by a company etc..( this was back in Feb CPAM told me)

I wouldn't give up at the first hurdle as I know many people here who should of made it but for one or other reason didn't stay and the ones who you thought didn't stand a chance in hell are still here, muddling through somehow. I'm not telling you what or what not to do but make sure you get all the right info, research, research do you speak French ? even a little goes along way.

jeffs1 1460016068

I'm a carpenter by trade and i speak a bit of french (i lived in france for 2 years with ex wife) but she sorted every thing out i can't speak to her about it as i don't know where she is now

Busterboy 1460035223

The way I understand it is that Jeffs E6000 will not kick in untill he retires - so he will be living on savings!
You will need private health care for at least 3 months ,- you apply to CPAM after 3 months residence with health care and they will want to know your income/savings & then bill you quarterly if you are accepted!
Just make sure you buy a small house ,not too much work, that fits your pocket!!

Busterboy 1460035289

The way I understand it is that Jeffs E6000 will not kick in untill he retires - so he will be living on savings!
You will need private health care for at least 3 months ,- you apply to CPAM after 3 months residence with health care and they will want to know your income/savings & then bill you quarterly if you are accepted!
Just make sure you buy a small house ,not too much work, that fits your pocket!!

chèvrefeuille 1460047256

I don't think that CPAM will consider you if you are living on savings. They will look at the interest on your capital as your income then tell you that your income is too low.

jeffs1 1460233593

Does the same rules apply if i buy a static caravan and have more savings as my outlay for accommodation would be cheaper meaning more dosh in the bank

COCO-783436 1460234776

no In France your ability to qualify for health care is based on income not savings

as previously suggested a small business to supplement your income is the way to qualify for health cover

we have lived in France for over 11 years and the social care /taxsystem is a mindfield!

COCO-783436 1460235081

I would Also add that to live on less than 10 000€ a year would be difficult even producing your own food you cannot avoid utility charges taxe foncières and habitation and telephone internet etc

as a family with three children we live on 24 000E and this is on a very tight budget with supplements from the CAF of 5000€

Josephine-Blogger-853338 1460311518

Normally statics have to be on campsites. Not many communes will allow you to site a static on on a piece of land and live in it, even if it's your own piece of land.

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