Drinking and Driving in Canada

The blood alcohol laws in Canada...

The national Criminal Code limit for blood alcohol level is 0.08 percent (80 mg of alcohol in 100 ml of blood). However, some provinces have blood alcohol limits of 0.05 percent. Anyone with a reading of more than 0.08 percent will be charged under the Criminal Code and suspended from driving for 90 days. Drivers of more than 0.05 percent but less than 0.08 percent (where the limit is 0.08 percent) will have their licence suspended for up to 30 days. If convicted of a Criminal Code offence for the first time, a person loses their licence for a year, the second time three years and the third time, banned from driving for life. The police have the power to stop any driver they suspect is driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs (impaired driving). Refusal to carry out an alcohol test will result in being charged under the Criminal Code. Drivers involved in accidents who are impaired and cause bodily harm may be sentenced up to ten years in prison. Causing death while impaired carries a sentence of up to 14 years in prison. New drivers (Level One and Level Two drivers) must have blood alcohol levels of zero when driving. Failure to do so may result in being charged under the Criminal Code and having their learner licence period extended. The Royal Canadian Mounted Police have an alcohol impaired and distracted driving factsheet for young drivers.