Television in Mexico

Find out about television standards in Mexico, with details of cable satellite and Internet TV providers...

The television standard in use in Mexico is ATSC.

Most countries in the world have either switched over, are switching over, or plan to switch over from analog TV broadcasting to digital TV broadcasting. Before the advent of digital broadcasting, the main three standards were:

  • NTSC: the USA, Canada, Japan
  • PAL: most of Western Europe, Australia, southern Africa
  • SECAM: Eastern Europe and France

Today, the main digital standards are:

  • DVB-T: most of the world, including Europe, southern Africa, Australia and southern Asia
  • ATSC: the USA, Canada, Mexico and South Korea
  • ISDB-T: most of South America
  • DTMB: China

The systems are not compatible, so a television produced for one system will not work on another.

Cable, Satellite and Internet TV

There are a number of options to get English-language TV programs in Mexico. Cable packages usually include telephone and Internet services as well as TV. It is generally possible to subscribe online, by calling their customer service line, or at a customer service center. Cable and satellite providers offer basic packages that include a limited number of channels, with many more available at extra cost; many cable providers also allow subscribers to watch programs online. Payments are made monthly.

There are a number of options to get English-language TV programs and movies in Mexico. Regular Mexican programming can be received via an aerial or satellite dish, or through a cable supplier.
Cable packages usually include telephone and Internet services as well as TV.  Most cable and satellite providers offer basic packages that include number of local channels, some of which broadcast in English or with English subtitles.  Additional premium channels will be available at extra cost; many cable providers also allow subscribers to watch programs online.


Those who wish to continue to access online streaming accounts or other media in their home countries might consider using a VPN (virtual proxy network) service.  These services allow users to direct their internet traffic through central servers so that they may use websites that restrict access to particular locations (geo-blocking).

IPTV providers (Internet protocol TV) outside of Mexico are also able to provide international digital TV channels and video on demand through set-top boxes.

Some of the main providers for cable and satellite TV in Mexico include:

Further reading